Overheating

9 10 2016

It happens not only with Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 devices. So it’s good to know more about your smartphone’s energy pack.


If a Li-ion battery overheats, hisses or bulges, immediately move the device away from flammable materials and place it on a non-combustible surface. If at all possible, remove the battery and put it outdoors to burn out.

A small Li-ion fire can be handled like any other combustible fire. For best result use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate). If the fire occurs in an airplane cabin, the FAA instructs flight attendants to use water or soda pop. Water-based products are most readily available and are appropriate since Li-ion contains very little lithium metal that reacts with water. Water also cools the adjacent area and prevents the fire from spreading. Research laboratories and factories also use water to extinguish Li-ion battery fires.
(batteryuniversity)

More …

Li-Ion Batteries

Safety Concerns

Take care and thanks for reading.

Note
No, it’s not true that I took this photo of a burning Note 7 with my iPhone 6S Plus.





Insecurity of Security Apps

1 06 2016

Open systems are almost always open to bad guys. Only limitation (a rigorously implemented “sandbox mode“) adds value to your digital life. Openness is only needed if smartphones are designed to be play stations.

It’s the job of manufacturers to offer security.

Think of it like this:

You buy a car. Then you have to visit a market for accessories to separately buy the safety belts. Nobody would accept that.


Regarding mobile devices without wheels everybody should know that there are many bad as well as innovative guys often behaving like terrorists and always on the way to compromise digital identities.

So …

Again it turns out that running iOS is the best way to stay secure.

Here is the latest analysis of Fraunhofer SIT …

Insecurity of Security Applications


Note

If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.

(George Orwell)

Thanks for taking your time.





The new Porsche 911

20 12 2015

The new 911 only has Apple Car Play because Google is Nicht Gut.

So much for “Do No Evil.” There’s no technological reason the 991/2 doesn’t have Android Auto playing through its massively upgraded PCM system.

But there is an ethical one.

As part of the agreement an automaker would have to enter with Google, certain pieces of data must be collected and mailed back to Mountain View, California. Stuff like vehicle speed, throttle position, coolant and oil temp, engine revs – basically Google wants a complete OBD2 dump whenever someone activates Android Auto.

Not kosher, says Porsche.

Obviously, this is “off the record,” but Porsche feels info like that is the secret sauce that makes its cars special. Moreover, giving such data to a multi-billion dollar corporation that’s actively building a car, well, that ain’t good, either. Apple, by way of stark contrast, only wants to know if the car is moving while Apple Play is in use. Makes you wonder about all the other OEMs who have agreed to Google’s requests/demands, no?

(motortrend com)

  
Dire straits for companies whose business model is based on selling customer data, especially in Europe. Google damaged their reputation with collecting data extensively. People don’t trust this data kraken any longer.

Thankfully Apple just sells exciting products.

More …



13 Cool Facts about the 2017 911



Apple and Porsche, about similarities



When government comes knocking



CarPlay by Apple


Thanks for visiting iNotes4You.





I want you(r data)!

13 12 2015

Good news for customers of the “iPhone company” …

Apple earns five stars in this year’s Who Has Your Back report. This is Apple’s fifth year in the report, and it has adopted every best practice we’ve identified as part of this report. We commend Apple for its strong stance regarding user rights, transparency, and privacy.

(Who has your back? report, EFF 2015)

  


More …

About privacy

XcodeGhost Q&A


Always keep in mind this saying of George Orwell …

If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.


Thanks for dropping by.





Tim Cook about privacy

26 03 2015

An open letter from Tim Cook, CEO at Apple Inc. since August 24, 2011, regarding Apple products, services and beliefs …

At Apple, your trust means everything to us. That’s why we respect your privacy and protect it with strong encryption, plus strict policies that govern how all data is handled.

Security and privacy are fundamental to the design of all our hardware, software, and services, including iCloud and new services like Apple Pay.

And we continue to make improvements. Two-step verification, which we encourage all our customers to use, in addition to protecting your Apple ID account information, now also protects all of the data you store and keep up to date with iCloud.
We believe in telling you up front exactly what’s going to happen to your personal information and asking for your permission before you share it with us. And if you change your mind later, we make it easy to stop sharing with us. Every Apple product is designed around those principles. When we do ask to use your data, it’s to provide you with a better user experience.

We’re publishing this website to explain how we handle your personal information, what we do and don’t collect, and why. We’re going to make sure you get updates here about privacy at Apple at least once a year and whenever there are significant changes to our policies.

A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product.

But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy. Our business model is very straightforward: We sell great products.

We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don’t “monetize” the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don’t read your email or your messages to get information to market to you.

IMG_3625.PNG

Our software and services are designed to make our devices better. Plain and simple.

One very small part of our business does serve advertisers, and that’s iAd. We built an advertising network because some app developers depend on that business model, and we want to support them as well as a free iTunes Radio service. iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.

Finally, I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will.

Our commitment to protecting your privacy comes from a deep respect for our customers. We know that your trust doesn’t come easy. That’s why we have and always will work as hard as we can to earn and keep it.

Tim
September 2014

Thanks for a remarkable statement.

Summary …

I cannot validate any of Tim’s statements. It needs technicians to look at the details. But what I know is that there is no evidence to not trust in Tim’s announcement.

Related links …

Tim Cook, the job after Jobs

2-Step Verification

Apple and the NSA

Thanks for dropping by.





Activation Lock Status

10 02 2015

In November 2014 Apple added a new tool to further increase the security of iOS devices. It’s called ACTIVATION LOCK STATUS.

Activation Lock is turned on by default since the launch of iOS 7 and with iOS 8 it comes together with a new feature called Send Last Location (Settings – iCloud – Find My iPhone – Send Last Location) which transmits the last known location of an iOS device before the internet connection is cut off or the battery is empty.

Apple’s Craig Federighi (CEO Software Development) …

We think this is going to be a really powerful theft deterrent.

Apple on it’s website …

Losing your iPhone feels lousy. Thankfully, Find My iPhone can help you get it back. But if it looks like that’s not going to happen, new security features in iOS 7 make it harder for anyone who’s not you to use or sell your device. Now turning off Find My iPhone or erasing your device requires your Apple ID and password. Find My iPhone can also continue to display a custom message, even after your device is erased. And your Apple ID and password are required before anyone can reactivate it. Which means your iPhone is still your iPhone. No matter where it is.

Many users, once they find out that their iOS device has been stolen, completely erase it from iCloud or another iOS device with Find My iPhone installed. Erasing of a device is followed by Activation. This feature forces users to enter the Apple ID and password associated with that device to regain access.

IMG_3613.PNG

The new web-based tool allows you to check whether a device is currently locked for activation or not. To use the tool, users are asked to enter an iOS device’s IMEI or Serial Number, which is then cross-checked with Apple’s internal database to ensure that Activation Lock is not currently turned on for that device.

Summary …

Activation Lock Status is a further sophisticated step to secure your Apple device.

Related links …

Security made by Apple

2-Step Verification

Security made by Apple

Activation Lock Status

Apple about Activation Lock

Thanks for surfing by.





About Privacy

18 01 2015

If you are an Apple fan and can’t take a joke just skip this post and accept my sincere apology.

2015/01/img_3898.png

In reality you can be sure that Apple takes care of your privacy.

About  Pay …

If you are not familiar with Apple’s payment system, here is what the company publishes on

This is what Apple publishes on its website …

Your wallet.
Without the wallet.
Paying in stores or within apps has never been easier. Gone are the days of searching for your wallet. The wasted moments finding the right card. Now payments happen with a single touch.

Apple Pay will change how you pay with breakthrough contactless payment technology and unique security features built right into the devices you have with you every day. So you can use your iPhone, Apple Watch, or iPad to pay in a simple, secure, and private way.

Related links …

Security Made by Apple

Tim Cook about Privacy

Apple Pay with iPhone 6

Thanks for being sympathetic.








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