About apps

10 09 2014

‘App’ is the modern term for application which means a set of instructions to let your device solve life’s dilemmas one app at a time.

Inextricably linked with apps are small animals which most aggressive life forms are well-known from tropical areas and called bugs. Today we have them also massively in the temperate zones and they are distributed for free by Apple, Microsoft, Google, medium-sized companies, and individual enterprises mainly via Apple’s App Store and Google’s Play Store.

20140617-091131-33091606.jpg

Free apps are almost always designed for promoting services or developed by individuals who just like programming or want to carve out a way to success in getting commissional work. It’s obvious that the paid ones are made for making money. Unfortunately many of them are offered just for making money. Developers should know that this is a short-term strategy and often borders on fraud.

We, as the customers, should punish these companies by writing appropriate reviews and ask Apple for refund of costs.

Note
A lot of craptacular apps that should never find their way to your iOS device can be found in the App Store. Apple just controls conformity of apps with their guidelines but doesn’t identify crap. Although Apple’s terms and conditions state that ‘All sales and rentals are final’ you can apply for a refund if your cause is legitimate. Here is how to do it:

  • Open your iTunes Account.
  • Open the Purchase History.
  • Click on ‘Report a problem’.
  • Select the app and click on ‘Report a problem’.
  • Choose one of the six categories Apple lists for app-related complaints and add legitimate reasons.

It’s still one of the biggest disadvantages of Apple’s App Store not to offer apps free for a limited time to decide if you want to keep it. Serious developers offer a so-called ‘Lite Version’ for free with some limitations of features.

Well, independent of the motivation individuals or businesses have when offering apps customers are only interested in bug-free versions just doing what they are intended for and offering a great user experience described in Apple’s iOS Human Interface Guidelines.

Classification of apps …

When we talk about apps we should first classify them.

Speaking in broad strokes apps may be classified as follows:

  • Table-Based Apps
    The app allows access to hierarchically organized data. Opening the app displays topics and often a Search-Field where you can enter a term. the app then displays topics matching the term. Tapping on a topic displays related information.
    Examples: dictionary, product description with parts lists
  • App based on Complex Databases
    This type of app is an extension to simple table-based apps with improved features of parsing out content. Often included is an online access that allows updating of the database to always work with actual data managed on a webserver. A simple solution is to download updated on demand and store them permanently in a local folder of the device. So the user is independent of a working internet connection. A more complex solution is the retrieval of updated records when needed.
  • Apps Improving Built-In Features
    iOS provides tons of features developers have access to. But some of Apple’s built-in apps don’t meet the requirements of users. With the camera you can take photos of several pages of a document. You will need an additional app to convert these image files into a single PDF, the scanned document.
    A typical example is Readdle’s app Scanner Pro where scanned documents additionally may be organized in folders.
  • Fully Dynamic Apps
    Similar to the database driven apps, these apps are the kind that rely purely on external information – Apps for social networking like Twitter, Weather Pro, WordPress, etc. usually there is Read-Write access to webservers (read tweets for displaying them, write new tweets).
    Some apps additionally provide encryption when transferring data from or to the device.
  • Apps for Creating Data
    The user enters the content (writes letters, creates spreadsheets, or presentations, annotates PDFs), manages storage places (local folders and cloud storages), uses convert algorithms (Microsoft Word to Apple Pages) and shares documents with other users. Typical apps of this kind are Apple’s iWork suite, Tap Forms Database, iThoughts Mind Mapping, Adobe Reader, etc.
  • Games
    These have the largest range of complexity, starting with something as simple as a PONG type functionality (PONG=one of the earliest video games by Atari) all the way up to a 3D physics engine that does high speed air racing. Scoring points, incorporating the user experience through the physical movement of the device, and hooking into Game Center are all possible.

Testing …

Developers have to learn four simple rules to become successful.

  • Take care about the system analysis.
    It’s the process of studying procedures in order to identify its goals and purposes and create a system (the app) that will achieve them in an efficient way.
  • Test your app and if you don’t find a bug test it again.
    Before starting any tests, developers have to shut down and use their schizophrenic partition to reboot. From now on they must behave like bad guys trying to destroy the whole work of this incompetent developer.
  • Listen to your customers.
    If features and the UI are driven by customer requests and feedbacks it’s likely that you will be successful with your business.
  • Set up a platform.
    That means create a mobile friendly website without ad, engage in social networks, etc.

All this doesn’t help if the app isn’t stable or the UI doesn’t feel like ‘Made for Apple’s mobiles’.

Here is how testing should work but in most cases it obviously doesn’t. One of the developers I’m talking about should be expected to do a professional job but it’s an individual enterprise which shows us how to do the job – a painful affair for the big company.

20140619-091058-33058773.jpg

Feel free to download this map from my Box account.

The alternative file formats have been created with iThoughts for iOS (.ITMZ file format). Compatibility to other tools is limited. The DOCX file format is suggested for those who don’t use a mind mapping tool. The file contains the image as well as a detailed outline of all topics.

Application File format
Adobe Reader PDF
Apple iWork/Microsoft Office DOCX
iThoughts ITMZ
MindManager MMAP
XMind XMIND

Testing an application is an indispensable task and it often takes more time to go through all the test scenarios than to write the code. The most important part of the whole testing procedure is called Functional Testing. This is a type of black box testing that is based on the specifications of the software that is to be tested.

Keep in mind that the developers of iThoughts and Tap Forms do it all alone.
They are project manager, quality assurance manager, programmer, CEO, website owner, publicity expert, accounting clerk, and often
complaisant husband, father of some kids, owner of a dog and tax payer.

The application as a whole system is tested by providing input and evaluating the system’s compliance with its specified requirements.

  • Unit Testing
    Unit Testing is performed by developers on individual units of source code. The developers use test data that is separate from the test data of the quality assurance team.
    The goal of unit testing is to isolate each part of the program and show that individual parts are correct in terms of requirements and functionality.
  • Integration Testing
    Integration Testing is done to determine whether all single units of the app properly work together.
  • System Testing
    Once all the components are integrated, the application as a whole is tested to see wether it meets the quality standards. This type of testing is performed by a specialized testing team. System Testing is one of the most important steps on the long way from an idea to the deployment of an app.

    • System Testing is the first step in the Software Development Life Cycle, where the application is tested as a whole.
    • The application is tested thoroughly to verify that it meets the functional and technical specifications.
    • The application is tested in an environment which is very close to the production environment where the application will be deployed.
    • System Testing enables the developers to test, verify, and validate both the business requirements as well as the application architecture.
  • Regression Testing
    Whenever an app is updated it is quite possible that other areas within the app have been affected by this change. The intent of Regression Testing is to ensure that a change, such as a bug fix did not result in another fault being uncovered in the application.
  • Acceptance Testing
    This is arguably the most important type of testing as it is conducted by the Quality Assurance Team who will gauge whether the application meets the intended specifications and satisfies the client.s requirements. The QA team will have a set of pre written scenarios and test cases that will be used to test the application.
  • Alpha Testing
    Unit testing, integration testing and system testing when combined are known as alpha testing. The teams look for spelling, broken links, quality of the help system, etc. The app will be tested on devices with the lowest specification to test loading times and any latency problems.
  • Beta Testing
    In beta testing a sample of the intended audience tests the application. Beta testing is also known as pre-release testing. Beta test versions of software are ideally distributed to a wide audience on the Web, partly to give the program a “real-world” test and partly to provide a preview of the next release. The audience will be testing the following:

    • Users will install, run the application and send their feedback to the project team.
    • Typographical errors, confusing application flow, and even crashes.
    • Getting the feedback, the project team can fix the problems before releasing the software to the actual users.
    • The more issues you fix that solve real user problems, the higher the quality of your application will be.
    • Having a higher-quality application when you release to the general public will increase customer satisfaction.

Two examples …

As a mind mapper and an engaged member of Google+ I frequently use my preferred mind mapping tool iThoughts by toketaWare as well as Google’s app Google+.

toketaWare
is a small software development business based in the UK (just outside York.) When I say small, I mean really small. Currently it’s just me, Craig Scott.
In addition to the iThoughts mindmap products, toketaWare also builds/maintains makeDoc and makeSlides (iOS apps for converting Markdown, OPML and text into MS Word and PowerPoint files).
Toketa is a term used in Judo to describe when a person has escaped from being pinned down i.e. they’ve broken free. Seemed apt somehow – software that sets you free. That’s the goal anyhow!

Google
Well, what can I say, the app Stocks on my iPhone tells me that the market capital is $378,1B. Without knowing the capital of toketaWare I’m quite sure that Google is ahead.

The app Google+ crashes a couple of times each day when my iPhone 4S running on iOS 7 is unlocked and the app was in suspended mode. This happens since about 12 months and the problem can easily be proofed by countless complaints in different communities on Google+.

20140617-092123-33683418.jpg

But there is even more. The app doesn’t provide any useful support for moderators and doesn’t allow relevant settings for your Google+ account. Searching, limited to content if specific communities is not possible. There is no list of people you have blocked. Text typed in the comment section may get lost if you switch to another app and return to the G+ app. Formatting is supported only by using special characters like *, -, and _.

If you look up the version history starting on 2011-12-05 (version 1.0.7.2940) you will find many useless new features within the 25 updated versions and countless bug fixes which didn’t fix the most annoying bugs.

Let’s have a look on the Reviews. I found 4.651 reviews for all versions which is definitely a negligible quantity compared to the number of downloads. The consequence for me is that reviews published in the App Store are most often useless if it comes to an objective assessment of an app based on a large/representative number of users.

Reasons are …

  • Apple hasn’t built bug reporting into the App Store, so customers use one-star ratings as a way of reporting bugs.
    Developers cannot contact people who post ratings.
  • People are much more likely to complain than to praise. If you have an app that crashes for 0.01% of your users, those users are generally not going to quietly ask Apple for refund. They’re going to post a negative review. However, the 99.99% of people for whom the app works great are not going to post five-star ratings.
  • The App Store only shows the ratings given to the latest version of an app. Every time a minor update is released, the app’s ratings history is effectively wiped out. If 0.01% of the users have a problem, the app ends up with ten one-star reviews which is a disaster for a developer.
  • Ratings are often made after a short time of usage and they most often do not reflect systematically collected experiences.

For those who make their living on the App Store, a one-star rating is an existential threat. If an app is rated one star, nobody will look at it or buy it. If it’s rated five stars, the company will make a decent living but lack of features may still hamper the usage of many customers. A typical case is the missing support for the WebDAV protocol which is essential if users do not have accounts for the predefined cloud providers offered in the app’s settings.

Since years I’m in close contact with two small companies

  • Tap Zapp Software Inc., Canada
    developing the database application Tap Forms
  • toketaWare, UK
    developing the mind mapping tool iThoughts

following Steve Jobs’ philosophy

To purchase is to build relationships.

A fast, understandable and friendly support ends up in a win-win-situation for both, customers and developers. Regardless of any educational background developers can learn from their customers.

Let’s have a look on the presentation of the app iThoughts.

20140617-092449-33889330.jpg

Meaningful images, factual descriptions of relevant features, a link to a website with lots of useful information and a ‘What’s new’ mind map delivered with every update.

I summarized the updates in a mind map. toketaWare publishes the details of updates in contrast to many other developers just describing their new versions with useless notes like

  • Various bug fixes
  • Overall performance improvements
  • Runs better than before
  • Improvements for reliability
  • Fixes to make the app a little better for you

20140617-092545-33945285.jpg

Apple’s guidelines …

An iPhone, by itself, is a somewhat dull device after you get over touching the screen of a cell phone. Sure, it’s an innovative device, but it’s just another cell phone with a unique way of interacting with it before applications are added.

20140617-094432-35072473.jpg

But once applications are added to the device, it becomes a far more compelling product with a series of great applications that easily make it the best cell phone in the market. And it’s because of Apple’s Guidelines every developer has to follow when offering software products.

20140617-181711-65831661.jpg

Feel free to download this map from my Box account.

The alternative file formats have been created with iThoughts for iOS (.ITMZ file format). Compatibility to other tools is limited. The DOCX file format is suggested for those who don’t use a mind mapping tool. The file contains the image as well as a detailed outline of all topics.

Application File format
Adobe Reader PDF
Apple iWork/Microsoft Office DOCX
iThoughts ITMZ
MindManager MMAP
XMind XMIND

Summary …

Developing an app successfully running through all stress tests and following Apple’s iOS Human Interface Guidelines is a quite complex task and it doesn’t differ from the development of an application running on computers.

Character traits define your personality, your underlying values and your beliefs. Maybe you remember my interview with Brendan Duddridge, the developer of the awarded database app Tap Forms.

I like Steve’s philosophy on design. Make it simple and beautiful to use. Steve surrounded himself with brilliant people who he could command to do the best work of their lives. I don’t have that luxury so I just try to build the best and easiest to use app that I can possibly think of.
(Brendan Duddridge)

I take my hat off to all the individual enterprises doing their job much better than their big competitors.

Related links …

App Development + Marketing

iThoughts, redesigned, reengineered, re-everythinged

Tap Zapp Software Inc.

Google+ on iOS devices

About guidelines …

App Store Review Guidelines

iOS Human Interface Guidelines

UI Design Dos and Don’ts

Thanks for dropping by.





Tap Zapp Software Inc.

12 07 2014

The strong benefit of a database is the synopsis of otherwise widely spread information. Apple’s App Store offers a lot of apps suitable for productive operations but all the information saved by these apps is cut into pieces and saved in app-specific folders. Database management tools manage all the different types of information in just one app.

I’m a programmier for Microsoft Access databases for about 20 years and founded a software company in 1979 in my parent’s basement with a Z80-based Sharp MZ 80K computer, the first publicly available computer in Germany.

20140328-210854.jpg

After buying my first Apple devices, an iPhone 3GS and an iPad 3, it was obvious to look for a powerful database app for iOS. Reviewing Bento 4 (which was removed from the App Store in Sep 2013), zBase, and many other apps it turned out that the SQLite-based app Tap Forms by Tap Zapp Software Inc. (Canada) is the best choice by far. I found what I expected …

  • many features wrapped in a plain and self-explaining UI
  • useful field types for all purposes
  • iCloud support
  • a continuos development
  • a fast and friendly support

And it’s not only me rating this app with 5 stars. Check out the March issue of Mac Format Magazine.

Tap Forms was the winner in a shootout between FileMaker Pro, iDatabase, Numbers, Panorama Sheets, and Symphytum. Each database app has its own strengths and weaknesses and are great apps for various purposes. But the conclusion that Tap Forms came out on top was great to see.

“Although picking a winner will always be subjective, for a straight Bento replacement, Tap Forms is the clear winner by a mile. The user interface is beautifully Mac-like, the structuring of data is similar enough to Bento that it offers only a shallow learning curve, it offers a direct import of Bento templates, and the iOS companion app is great.”

My interview with Brendan …

Brendan Duddridge is the founder of Tap Zapp Software Inc., Canada. Sadly there was no way for me to talk to him face to face but thankfully a mail sent from my iPhone and winging its way to Canada and back fixed the problem in a jiffy.

So here is what I asked and what I got back.

01 The way to a successful business sometimes starts in the parent’s garage or basement up to the climate conditions.
What was your way to writing your first line of code?

I wrote my first lines of code by copying code from a magazine about computer programming back in 1979 on a Radio Shack TRS-80 computer that a friend of mine owned. It was in the BASIC programming language. So a very very long time ago. Ever since then I’ve been hooked on programming and have never stopped. There’s always so much to learn and new things to make. Computers and programming was always my hobby, but they are also now my career. I can’t imagine doing anything else.

02 If you look back what were the reasons for learning a programming language?

I was just fascinated to see that typing these strange commands into a computer could make things happen on the screen. I was first amazed by seeing one of my teachers typing out a computer program on the TRS-80 computer we had in our classroom. It was amazing how quickly he typed. At the time it looked like complete nonsense to me. Ever since then I knew that I wanted to be able to make programs myself.

03 Do you think programmers are basically autodidacts?

Well, I have a degree in Computer Science, so I learned a lot about programming from university. However, for the most part I think anyone can learn to program without a formal education in Computer Science. There’s so many learning materials available for free on the Internet these days and through iTunes University that if you have the slightest interest in learning to program, you can basically do it all on your own. It’s also very helpful to work in a team at some point because you can learn a lot from others. I think the main thing is to just be passionate about it. If you’re interested in creating new things and seeing them come to life on screen, then just go for it. Don’t wait until you have that amazing idea. That could take years. Start small and work your way up from there.

04 Founding a company is a quite painful job because you have to focus on many administrative tasks you probably don’t like. Can you give us an estimated value for the time you spent for developing the environment as a percentage of your 24h day?

I’m terrible at the business side of things. I tend to just want to program and I procrastinate a lot on the business side of operating Tap Zapp Software. I mostly just do programming and customer support. I love to program and I love to engage with customers via my blog, my forum, and via email. I usually get incredibly positive feedback from my customers. So much so that it keeps me working as hard as I can because I just have an innate desire to please them as best as I can. After all, when people say nice things to you, you want to do nice things for them. I do have an accountant to do all the nasty accounting work for me and to prepare my taxes. But because I am a one-man shop who works at home, there’s not a lot of overhead involved in running Tap Zapp Software. That’s a great thing because it gives me more time to focus on improving Tap Forms.

05 When did you start with coding your database application Tap Forms?

I started the design of Tap Forms by using Omni Graffle to layout the screens that I thought I would need to make the first version of Tap Forms. I did that probably back in May of 2008. WWDC that year was from June 9 to June 13 so I started thinking about Tap Forms just before then. I knew that I wanted to have an app idea before going to WWDC that year. The initial idea for Tap Forms came about after a friend of mine showed me an app on his Blackberry which he used to keep track of his passwords. I don’t remember the name of the app though, although it was pretty rough.

After seeing the original iPhone and seeing which apps it shipped with, the one app which didn’t come installed was some type of database organizer. Sure it came with the Notes app, but you couldn’t really organize notes into different categories and utilize all the different keyboard types for the different types of data you would want to organize.

Well that was a good thing because I had lots of database development experience already and I knew I could build an app that would let people organize all their personal information.

06 When did you upload your first version of Tap Forms to Apple?

I believe the first version I uploaded to Apple was around September 5, 2008. The first version was approved and went live on September 28, 2008.

07 Can you give us the a priority list for the most important three tasks?

I’m sorry, but I’m not sure what you mean by this question. Do you mean what 3 new features I’m working on for Tap Forms? Or do you mean a priority list of tasks that must be completed in order to develop any app?

Sorry, obviously not the best and easiest wording I used.
I mean tasks regarding your profession like brainstorming, testing, coding, staying tuned via social networks, or something like this.

I think of how I’m going to implement new features all the time. I don’t have a team to work with, but that does not mean that I cannot brainstorm new ideas. I can be driving my car or doing other mundane tasks and still be thinking about implementation details for new features. In fact, I’m doing this task almost all the time. As far as staying in tune via social networks, mostly I follow a few iOS developers who are very good and provide some very useful advice. Stack Overflow is also an incredible resource for any developer who’s working on tough problems. There are some very smart people on there. I answer questions from time to time if I feel confident I can provide a good answer. I get a really good feeling if I am able to help someone else out with a problem they’re having.

08 Many of my blogs are app reviews. At the time I installed about 150 apps on my iOS devices. Nearly every day I get an update notification and in many cases an app was already updated some days ago. The description always contains the word ‘Bugfixing’.
Can you give us a brief overview of your internal control system for testing apps before launching?

I utilize the excellent TestFlight system for distributing Tap Forms to my beta testers and translators. I also have a private forum on my website where authorized beta testers can provide me with bug reports and feedback. I also have a feedback button on my home page which links to UserVoice where I also receive bug reports, feature requests, and other feedback. Many customers also just email me with their bug reports, feedback, and feature requests. I get a lot of help from my translators and beta testers for making sure that Tap Forms is functioning properly. I also do a lot of testing myself of course.

09 Do you think maths is an important part of education for a developer?

I think it’s important to have an analytical mind to be able to develop applications. But I think you can have that without having a strong mathematics background. I had to take some crazy math courses in university, but for the most part I haven’t had to use them very much for the types of apps that I program. If you’re programming games you may need to know some math, but even today a lot of libraries are provided for you that handle the complex math that you would need. Now you can just type in a value and tell an object how much gravitational force is applied to it and it will do all the math for you and your object drops to the ground and bounces around a bit. It’s amazing what is available for free for developers these days. In fact, an app that I recently helped to develop (in between work on Tap Forms) is called PencilCase by Robots and Pencils (www.pencilcase.io). PencilCase lets you build an app using objects by dragging and dropping them onto a canvas. You can apply physics to objects, have them collide with each other, prompt the user for information, display web sites, etc. All without writing a single line of code. You can even publish a PencilCase to the App Store! So there’s lots of tools available now for developers of all skill levels. No maths required :-)

10 Do you think a developer should be experienced in more than one programming language?

I’ve personally learned about a dozen languages over the years. I think it’s important to learn a few in order to give you a broader idea of the capabilities of different languages. It also helps when you’re wanting to communicate with other systems. For example, you would most likely write a web application using Java, Ruby, Python, or Perl, but write your mobile app client in Objective-C or Java. So I do think it’s important to know more than one language. It opens up opportunities for you.

11 Tell us, what’s on your work desk?

Not much actually. I don’t actually program at a desk. Because I work at home, I pretty much just use the armrest of the couch. It’s quite comfortable :-) I program using a Retina MacBook Pro 15” with 16 GB of RAM and a 768 GB SSD drive. I backup everything over Time Machine to a Synology NAS drive.

12 Your hobbies are?

Strangely enough, my hobbies are programming. Although I do enjoy watching movies, but I’m not sure that can be considered a hobby. In the summer time I like to drive my Pontiac Solstice GXP convertible sports car as much as I can. I occasionally make modifications to it to enhance its appearance or performance. So I guess that’s kind of my hobby.

20140711-191806-69486427.jpg

13 Steve Jobs founded Apple and his philosophy was the key to success.
What duo you think are the main points also valid for you personally?

I like Steve’s philosophy on design. Make it simple and beautiful to use. Steve surrounded himself with brilliant people who he could command to do the best work of their lives. I don’t have that luxury so I just try to build the best and easiest to use app that I can possibly think of.

14 Steve Jobs’ philosophy is often summarized in ‘Focus’, ‘Say No’, ‘Connect the dots’, ‘Secrecy’. Can you put it in an order for us?

I’m not as big on secrecy as Apple is of course. But I kind of operate under the radar. Apple has all eyes on them with every little move they make, so they have no choice but to keep everything a secret for as long as possible. Occasionally I’ll mention a new feature on my forum that I’m working on or let a customer know that the issue they’re having has been fixed in the next update.

I do get requests from customers for features which would be great to have, but for only a minor subset of Tap Forms customers, so I have to politely decline some feature requests. After all, I can’t possibly put every feature into the app, not just because I am only one person working on it, but because I don’t want Tap Forms to become a bloated mess. But still, there are many new features which I have planned for Tap Forms that I believe will delight current and future customers for years to come.

15 What are your thoughts about the Android platform?

I don’t particularly like the Android platform. It just feels clunky to me. It’s not a very smooth experience navigating around. Perhaps that’s because of it’s Java roots. I don’t know. Or perhaps it’s because they’ve had to work around Apple’s patents on scrolling and bounce-back and other aspects of iOS. And just because you can add a setting for this and a setting for that and add this feature or add that feature, doesn’t mean that you should. Some people may feel like it gives you a choice, but I believe that giving people too many choices just makes your product bloated and inelegant. I’ve been asked to make Tap Forms for Android, but I have no intentions on doing that at this time. If the iOS and Mac eco-system ever deteriorates enough so that I need to switch platforms then I will at that time. But for now Tap Forms is doing exceptionally well. Before writing for iOS and Mac, I used to be a Java developer. So developing for Android wouldn’t be much of a stretch for me. I just choose not to do it right now.

16 What’s your strategy for the future?

My strategy for the future is to just build the best version of Tap Forms that I possibly can. There are so many features that customers have requested that it gives me an endless pool of things that I can draw from in order to improve Tap Forms. Of course I can’t add every feature requested, but I can certainly add the best features that I believe will be of most value to the majority of my current and future Tap Forms customers.

Brendan, thanks a lot for taking your time.

Features of Tap Forms …

Brendan brought a powerful database management system to Apple’s mobiles and the Mac following this guideline

Simplicity is often equated with minimalism. Yet true simplicity is so much more than just the absence of clutter or the removal of decoration. It’s about offering up the right things, in the right place, right when you need them. It’s about bringing order to complexity. And it’s about making something that always seems to “just work.” When you pick something up for the first time and already know how to do the things you want to do, that’s simplicity.
(Sir Jonathan Ive)

So even users without special knowledge about databases are able to organize their data.

Here is a mind map visualizing all features of Tap Forms. It was created for a comparison of Tap Forms with the competing app zBase (see the full post under ‘Related links’).

20140330-091230.jpg

Feel free to download this map from my Box account.

The alternative file formats have been created with iThoughts HD for iPad (.ITMZ file format). Compatibility to other tools is limited. The DOCX file format is suggested for those who don’t use a mind mapping tool. The file contains the image as well as a detailed outline of all topics.

Application File format
Adobe Reader PDF
Apple iWork/Microsoft Office DOCX
iThoughts ITMZ
MindManager MMAP
XMind XMIND

Summary …

An exciting insight in the work of an engaged company developing the best available database for devices running on iOS and OSX.

Thanks a lot Brendan. Keep on coding at it’s best, drive carefully and stay on track with your Pontiac Solstice GXP.

Related links …

About the company…

Tap Zapp Software Inc., Canada

About the desktop companion of Tap Forms …

Tap Forms for Mac

An application of Tap Forms …

Go Paperless with Tap Forms

About app development …

App Development and Marketing

About the usage of databases …

DBMS on iOS devices (1)

DBMS on iOS devices (2)

DBMS on iOS devices (3)

DBMS on iOS devices (4)

DBMS on iOS devices (5)

Importing Data

From Access To Tap Forms

zBase vs Tap Forms

Thanks a lot for visiting my blog.








%d bloggers like this: