A copy of your data

3 07 2018

At a Wall Street Journal conference in 2010, Steve Jobs talked about the responsibility tech companies have to protect user privacy.

“No, Silicon Valley is not monolithic. We’ve always had a very different view at privacy with some of our colleagues in the Valley. We take privacy extremely serious. Privacy means people know what they’re signing up for. In plain English and repeatedly. That’s what it means. … I believe people are smart and some people wanna share more data than other people do. Ask them. Ask them every time. … Let them know precisely what you gonna do with their data.”

You like to know

what Apple knows about you?

The EU‘s GDPR gives you the right to request what companies know about you.

• Visit https://www.apple.com/privacy/contact/

• Fill out the form.

• Then you‘ll get an e-mail from Apple.

„Dear Mr. Unterstenhoefer,

Thank you for contacting Apple’s privacy team.

At Apple, we take the privacy and security of your personal information very seriously. We design our products and services with this in mind.

We can arrange for a report of your account details as controlled by Apple.

However, to ensure the security of your personal information, we need to confirm your identity. Could you please send me the following information associated with the account, where available:

– full name

– Apple ID if known

– email address

– street address

– telephone number

– a registered product serial number

– AppleCare support case number, or date and time of AppleCare support chat

Please do not send any sensitive information such as credit card details or passwords.“

• Reply with the required information.

That’s it.

About a week after submitting the information requested, you‘ll receive a link and a password for downloading a .XLSX file, which can be opened in applications, like Microsoft Excel, Google Docs, or Apple Numbers.

Thanks for visiting my blog.





Simple wallpapers

12 06 2018

and their relation to iOS development.

Distracting wallpapers? Not on my iPhone.

Think about these words of Sir Jonathan Ive, responsible for Apple’s iconic design.

“You have to deeply understand the essence of a product in order to be able to get rid of the parts that are not essential.”

So black is my preferred theme.

If you think about more than just wallpapers you’ll quickly find out that simplicity would also be a nice feature for operating systems.

Every year users and developers all over the world are involved in the vicious circle of bugs and more or less successful attempts to fix them. If somebody would do a cost-benefit analysis of an update I’m not sure about the results.

The irony of this oxymoron is that simplicity can be quite difficult. It’s not about what you can add, but what you can remove.

Does it really make sense to develop what’s technically possible but meaningless in our everyday life? For people with special requirements nobody would call innovative ideas applesauce but there are tens of millions of users just wasting their time with useless features (and bugs).

Customers appreciate bug-free operating systems and apps.

With every iteration of an OS – wether it’s iOS, macOS, Android, or Windows – customers are faced with problems they experienced already years ago.

Apple, just follow Albert Einstein’s saying

Intellectuals solve problems

geniuses prevent them.

Keep it simple like my minimalist wallpaper and focus on finishing products, testing them extensively and delighting customers with bug-free features.

Thanks for taking your time.





Liam retired

5 06 2018

Daisy is the new destroyer
recycling tons of valuable material.

Daisy disassembles 200 of nine different iPhone models per hour. Apple can recover materials that traditional recyclers can’t – at a higher quality.

Keep in mind

a ton of Gold is $43,000,000 as of April 2018.

This, possibly more, can be recycled per year. And there are many more high-priced materials like Aluminum, Silver, Rare Earth, Tungsten, Copper, Platinum Group Metals, Tin, Cobalt, and Tantalum.

Sustainable recycling …

It’s not to be had for nothing.

We have to pay a lot more for products which are made without taking finite resources from the earth.

The industry follows lots of technological standards but I don’t see any initiative of the big manufacturers of eWaste to create a consortium which establishes rules for making eco-sensitive products (e.g. without chargers as an option, replaceable batteries, etc). The focus is still on making money. Adding more and more Smart Home Products needing more and more resources is not so smart as the industry likes to tell us.

Daisy in action …

Please,
keep your device longer than a year.





Copycats?

30 05 2018

It often takes a long long time
to create a product near to perfectness.

Here are some thoughts about a discussion which is quite useless in many cases. They refer to “News” published about the triple-lens technology of HUAWEI’s new camera system and the assumption that Apple will copy this approach to improve image quality.

It’s a rocky road for the R&D guys from an early idea via a patent filing in 2009 to the innovative True Depth Camera for facial recognition implemented in Apple’s latest iPhone X in 2017.

This wouldn’t be possible without OPTICS, the branch of physics which involves the behaviour and properties of light, including its interactions with matter and the construction of instruments that use or detect it. It started with the development of lenses by the ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamians in 700 BC.

For the fans of competing technologies:

Yeah, you’re right. Apple is a copycat.

They also copied Wireless Charging in that they used essential results of the groundbreaking publication *“A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field”*

published by Scottish J.C. Maxwell in 1865.

What can we learn?

Everything has its preceding ideas and the copycat discussion is quite useless. What matters for us as customers is that we see improvements in devices of the brand we’re addicted to.

It’s strange to see that the manufacturers often do not claim to be THE FIRST who developed a technology but authors of magazines and of course fanboys do. They all don’t know who started the development first and they all don’t understand that you can’t copy a technology simply by buying a competing device and analyzing it.

The details of

US Patent 9582889

Thanks for reading.





LIAM – An Innovation Story

24 04 2018

Apple’s 26-armed robotic cutting tool
that removes valuable materials from iPhones

Liam has the potential to recover materials for every 100,000 iPhone 6 devices:

Aluminum 1900 kg, Gold 1.3 kg, Silver 7 kg, Rare Earth Elements 24 kg, Tungsten 3.5 kg, Copper 800 kg, Platinum Group, Metals 0.4 kg, Tin 55 kg, Cobalt 550 kg, Tantalum 2.5 kg.

So Apple is on the way to a closed loop but it will still take a long time to produce “zero waste” devices.

Sustainable recycling …

It’s not to be had for nothing.

We have to pay a lot more for products which are made without taking finite resources from the earth.

The industry follows lots of technological standards but I don’t see any initiative of the big manufacturers of eWaste to create a consortium which establishes rules for making eco-sensitive products (e.g. without chargers as an option, replaceable batteries, etc). The focus is still on making money. Adding more and more Smart Home Products needing more and more resources is not so smart as the industry likes to tell us.

More …

Apple Environment

Must read …

LIAM – An Innovation Story (PDF)

Must view …

Mashable – About Zero Waste

Thanks for reading.





Vilfredo Pareto and iOS 12

2 04 2018

The Pareto Principle
A guideline for iOS 12 development
Thumbs down for feature proliferation

The Pareto principle, also known as the 80-20 Rule states that roughly only 20% of the causes affect 80% of the effects. Applied to iOS it would mean that just 20% of the bugs cause 80% of all errors. That’s at least what Microsoft found out with an error-reporting tool embedded in Windows and Office.

iOS 11 development and maintenance was a rocky road for both Apple and its customers.

Released on September 19, 2017 we had iOS 11, 11.0.1, 11.0.2, 11.0.3, 11.1, 11.1.1, 11.1.2, 11.2, 11.2.1, 11.2.2, 11.2.5, 11.2.6 as of March 9, 2018.

So iOS 12 is going to be an update that focuses heavily on bug fixes and refinements to the underlying code. According to Bloomberg, Apple was originally planning to introduce features that included a refresh of the Home screen with a redesigned app grid, a revamped CarPlay interface, improvements to core apps like Mail, and updates to picture-taking, photo editing, and photo sharing, but the company has opted to delay these features until 2019 in order to focus more heavily on making iPhones more responsive and less prone to cause customer support issues.

It shouldn’t be that difficult for Apple’s developers and testers to find that bugging 20% in their i -buggy- OS if the management successfully revamped the flow of operations.

But …

What’s forgotten is that these 20% are often the most complex, most difficult issues to correct and the most likely to spawn new problems as part of the correction process.

Now it’s your turn Craig (@HairForceOne) Federighi. Inner values count. Force your devs to make iOS 12 bulletproof.

More …

More about the Pareto Principle

Note

Don’t ask me wether it’s true that 80% of a swimming iPhone X is below, while only 20% is visible above the surface.

Thanks for reading.
iOS 12. Let’s keep our fingers crossed.





Zuckerberg didn’t get it

31 03 2018

Copy and Paste some of Steve’s beliefs is welcome

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which takes effect on May 25th will restrict how tech companies collect, store, and use personal data. In this context nobody talks about Apple but Facebook and Google.

There should be more people to learn from Steve Jobs’ beliefs about dealing with customer data.

Collecting data, selling them and using them for manipulation is a business model which shouldn’t be accepted any longer.

At a Wall Street Journal conference in 2010, Steve Jobs discussed the responsibility tech companies have to protect user privacy. Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, whose company is taking heat for its data sharing practices, was in the audience.

Here is what I extracted from the video:

“No, Silicon Valley is not monolithic. We’ve always had a very different view at privacy with some of our colleagues in the Valley.

We take privacy extremely serious. Privacy means people know what they’re signing up for. In plain English and repeatedly. That’s what it means. … I believe people are smart and some people wanna share more data than other people do. Ask them. Ask them every time. … Let them know precisely what you gonna do with their data.”

And here’s the video;

My suggestion, follow Apple’s strong convictions and #DeleteFacebook.

Btw,
we’ll see an updated Apple ID website soon with revamped privacy settings, an option to download all your data, and entirely delete your account (which can be a nightmare on other platforms).

Thanks for dropping by.








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