iOS in the car

20 03 2015

or

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

This can happen if a high-tech car (a brand new Audi A3 with state-of-the-art security features), an iPhone (a generally disturbing factor like any other electronic device in the hands of humans), and an experienced driver (but inattentive for just a second) come together on a German Autobahn (freeway) and cause a rear-end collision with an extremely high deceleration. See the photo, does it look like a heavy impact? No, but it was horrible and fortunately the car got sidetracked because the other party drove a brand new Volkswagen designed to redirect forces.

It was on February 11, 2015 and the car (fortunately a fully insured rental car) was a total loss. The driver, it was me, still suffers from lots of bruises and a breastbone fracture caused by various airbags which opened in a jiffy to prevent the loss of an Apple fan.

You might call me a moron but you shouldn’t forget that humans frequently are as buggy as iOS 8. Shit happens Crashes happen.

Here is the recommendation for all of you based on my experience:

Your iThing is a really useful e-helper but neither an iPhone, nor an iPad, nor a Watch, nor any other iOS based feature (except navigation) should be used in a moving 4-wheel mobile device.

The human brain is a processor with a single CPU (nevertheless in some way much more powerful than any 64-Bit iThing ever can be) and it’s not capable of multitasking. It either focuses on the traffic or communicates with your iThing regardless of talking to SIRI or listening to Apple’s voice assistant intensively.

Whatever Apple will tell you

“Invite more apps along for the ride.”
or
“CarPlay The best iPhone experience on four wheels.”

iOS in the car is only helpful if it’s working quietly in the background, giving you some short audio advices, or just monitors what you are doing. Users are acquainted with all the security advices but often do not act rational. That’s what vendors of infotainment systems know but ignore when advertising their products.

Some headlines showing the facts …

Thats what I found with a quick Google search:

  • Distractions caused by smartphones contribute to about 25% of U.S. automobile accidents
  • Wake-up call: Accidents linked to smartphone use rising in Tokyo
  • Some 40 million Koreans now have smartphones, and an increasing number of them are causing accidents in busy areas
  • Germany’s Autobahnen are getting more and more dangerous because of the usage of smartphones. It’s unjustifiable that e.g. Ford allows the forwarding of an SMS to the navigation display.

… and uncountable more publications.

Definitely not the right way to solve the problem is to separate the normal people from the addicts like the city of Chongqing in China reportedly did when setting up the country’s first sidewalk for ‘mobile phone addicts’, with a lane specifically dedicated to those glued to their screens.

There is just one solution.

First think wether you really need a constant incoming bit radiation.
If it’s relevant, stop before using your mobile device.

Do you know that mobiles can be powered off?

It saves lives, yours, others, and that of your battery.

Steve Jobs take …

“My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules…
That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand.
I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids.”

Just adopt Steve’s belief for yourself.

Note …

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

originally the title of a well-know 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western means in this context

The Audi, me, and the pain.

Related links …

Multitasking

China sets up first ever mobile phone lane

I hope you didn’t read this post in your car while driving.

Thanks for dropping by.


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