Push and Pull

27 02 2013

We are not talking about pull-down menus or push-up bras.

This blog is about the technology to immediately transfer information to a recipient (Push) or to get information by asking if there are any news available (Pull).

What is Push and Pull?

Push
The Post office is the active part and delivers the mail when there are new letters.
Getting a phone call and the daily newspaper are examples for the Push technology’s well.
In all situations you subscribed to something.

Pull
You are the active part when going to the post office and looking for new letters in your post office box. This generates more ‘traffic’ and so it’s not as efficient as the Push procedure.
I there is nothing new you flogged a dead horse.

Further examples of the Pull technology are browsing the web, where you ask via Google Search Engine and get the answer from a Web server which displays the site you were looking for.
No subscription is required to use the Pull technology. Unlike buying a newspaper at the kiosk your mobile device has to identify itself to get the requested information. This is done by your provider in connection with your SIM card.

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Some of your iPhone apps are more pushy than others, and often you’d like them to stay that way. These apps take advantage of Apple’s push notification service to send you badges, sounds and alerts. However, too many notices from too many apps can get distracting, even annoying.
Push notifications of apps can be set up individually or collectively using SETTINGS of your device.

What does your device do?

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Deactivate all push notifications …

Go to Settings – Notifications and turn off ‘Scheduled’.
Set suitable options for ‘Allow Calls From’ and ‘Repeated Calls’
Then go back to Settings and turn on ‘Do not disturb’.

Deactivate all push notifications for an app …

To completely turn off push notifications just turn off everything you just listed for that particular app: badges, banners, sounds, and whether the app appears in the ‘Notification Center’.

Not every app has to keep a connection open to some server, but there is one central connection that is kept alive for all push notifications for all apps.

In other words:
If you turn push off for an app that doesn’t receive any, there will be no change in battery life whatsoever. The easy way to know which push notifications are sucking your battery life, just look at what you’re receiving more often during the day. If you receive a Twitter notification every 5 minutes, all day long, the screen will always have to turn itself on to show it to you. This adds up usage minutes and drains battery power.

E-Mail …

Got to Settings – Mail, Contacts, Calendars – Fetch New Data.
If you turn on ‘Push’ you will get E-Mail immediately after your provider received a message for you. If you turn off ‘Push’ the timeframe below will be valid and uses the PULL technology that means, your device asks your provider whether there is anything new for you.

The battery life …

I found many articles saying that the battery life decreases rapidly when turning on push notifications. I started a test with 5 E-Mail accounts and activated notifications for Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, iMessage, about.me, Quora, StumbleUpon, 4 forums via Tapatalk and the German ifun.de sending messages nearly every 20 minutes.

Measuring the battery capacity on a normal day with Push and on another day without Push my impression was that there is no significant difference. This is admittedly subjective as I am not able to set laboratory conditions. 3-5% more or less battery power is marginal compared to the other 70 to 80% the iPhone consumes while doing other things.

If you want to save energy you must deactivate all settings which make the device to a smartphone and you better move over to a 20$ mobile phone.

You can find many suggestions about using push or pull to keep your battery alive for a longer time. All these discussions are for the trash, because the energy consumption depends on
how many notifications you get on an average and how Push is implemented in the different applications. Setting up Push requires to keep at least one connection alive all the time. Otherwise the pushing party would contact the nirvana. If there are less notifications it’s recommended to use Push technology because keeping a connection alive does not drain your power significant.

Pull technology is recommended for users who want to decide themselves what and what time he wants to really use the information. It’s monkey business to receive all the informations even if you have no time to read them.

So decide for yourself whether using Push or Pull.

My personal recommendation is, pull the information you want at a time you want and on an amount you want and don’t let the aliens give the beat. You only read your E-Mails when you are in a position to and have the time. Doing a manual download takes seconds and information can be read then or at your leisure.

Reducing energy consumption …

Here are some suggestions to reduce energy consumption when using Apple’s new operating system iOS 7.

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The history …

The Apple Push Notification Service is a service created by Apple Inc. that was launched together with iOS 3.0 on June 17, 2009. It uses push technology through a constantly open IP connection to forward notifications from the servers of third party applications to the Apple devices.
Scott Forstall stated that push notifications were a better means to maintain battery life than background processes (which are used for pull technology) as far as receiving notifications are concerned.

A more technical view …

github
Apple Push Service Protocol

Thanks for dropping by.


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