The new Porsche 911

20 12 2015

The new 911 only has Apple Car Play because Google is Nicht Gut.

So much for “Do No Evil.” There’s no technological reason the 991/2 doesn’t have Android Auto playing through its massively upgraded PCM system.

But there is an ethical one.

As part of the agreement an automaker would have to enter with Google, certain pieces of data must be collected and mailed back to Mountain View, California. Stuff like vehicle speed, throttle position, coolant and oil temp, engine revs – basically Google wants a complete OBD2 dump whenever someone activates Android Auto.

Not kosher, says Porsche.

Obviously, this is “off the record,” but Porsche feels info like that is the secret sauce that makes its cars special. Moreover, giving such data to a multi-billion dollar corporation that’s actively building a car, well, that ain’t good, either. Apple, by way of stark contrast, only wants to know if the car is moving while Apple Play is in use. Makes you wonder about all the other OEMs who have agreed to Google’s requests/demands, no?

(motortrend com)

  
Dire straits for companies whose business model is based on selling customer data, especially in Europe. Google damaged their reputation with collecting data extensively. People don’t trust this data kraken any longer.

Thankfully Apple just sells exciting products.

More …



13 Cool Facts about the 2017 911



Apple and Porsche, about similarities



When government comes knocking



CarPlay by Apple


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I want you(r data)!

13 12 2015

Good news for customers of the “iPhone company” …

Apple earns five stars in this year’s Who Has Your Back report. This is Apple’s fifth year in the report, and it has adopted every best practice we’ve identified as part of this report. We commend Apple for its strong stance regarding user rights, transparency, and privacy.

(Who has your back? report, EFF 2015)

  


More …

About privacy

XcodeGhost Q&A


Always keep in mind this saying of George Orwell …

If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.


Thanks for dropping by.





Tim Cook about privacy

26 03 2015

An open letter from Tim Cook, CEO at Apple Inc. since August 24, 2011, regarding Apple products, services and beliefs …

At Apple, your trust means everything to us. That’s why we respect your privacy and protect it with strong encryption, plus strict policies that govern how all data is handled.

Security and privacy are fundamental to the design of all our hardware, software, and services, including iCloud and new services like Apple Pay.

And we continue to make improvements. Two-step verification, which we encourage all our customers to use, in addition to protecting your Apple ID account information, now also protects all of the data you store and keep up to date with iCloud.
We believe in telling you up front exactly what’s going to happen to your personal information and asking for your permission before you share it with us. And if you change your mind later, we make it easy to stop sharing with us. Every Apple product is designed around those principles. When we do ask to use your data, it’s to provide you with a better user experience.

We’re publishing this website to explain how we handle your personal information, what we do and don’t collect, and why. We’re going to make sure you get updates here about privacy at Apple at least once a year and whenever there are significant changes to our policies.

A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product.

But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy. Our business model is very straightforward: We sell great products.

We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don’t “monetize” the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don’t read your email or your messages to get information to market to you.

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Our software and services are designed to make our devices better. Plain and simple.

One very small part of our business does serve advertisers, and that’s iAd. We built an advertising network because some app developers depend on that business model, and we want to support them as well as a free iTunes Radio service. iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.

Finally, I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will.

Our commitment to protecting your privacy comes from a deep respect for our customers. We know that your trust doesn’t come easy. That’s why we have and always will work as hard as we can to earn and keep it.

Tim
September 2014

Thanks for a remarkable statement.

Summary …

I cannot validate any of Tim’s statements. It needs technicians to look at the details. But what I know is that there is no evidence to not trust in Tim’s announcement.

Related links …

Tim Cook, the job after Jobs

2-Step Verification

Apple and the NSA

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Activation Lock Status

10 02 2015

In November 2014 Apple added a new tool to further increase the security of iOS devices. It’s called ACTIVATION LOCK STATUS.

Activation Lock is turned on by default since the launch of iOS 7 and with iOS 8 it comes together with a new feature called Send Last Location (Settings – iCloud – Find My iPhone – Send Last Location) which transmits the last known location of an iOS device before the internet connection is cut off or the battery is empty.

Apple’s Craig Federighi (CEO Software Development) …

We think this is going to be a really powerful theft deterrent.

Apple on it’s website …

Losing your iPhone feels lousy. Thankfully, Find My iPhone can help you get it back. But if it looks like that’s not going to happen, new security features in iOS 7 make it harder for anyone who’s not you to use or sell your device. Now turning off Find My iPhone or erasing your device requires your Apple ID and password. Find My iPhone can also continue to display a custom message, even after your device is erased. And your Apple ID and password are required before anyone can reactivate it. Which means your iPhone is still your iPhone. No matter where it is.

Many users, once they find out that their iOS device has been stolen, completely erase it from iCloud or another iOS device with Find My iPhone installed. Erasing of a device is followed by Activation. This feature forces users to enter the Apple ID and password associated with that device to regain access.

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The new web-based tool allows you to check whether a device is currently locked for activation or not. To use the tool, users are asked to enter an iOS device’s IMEI or Serial Number, which is then cross-checked with Apple’s internal database to ensure that Activation Lock is not currently turned on for that device.

Summary …

Activation Lock Status is a further sophisticated step to secure your Apple device.

Related links …

Security made by Apple

2-Step Verification

Security made by Apple

Activation Lock Status

Apple about Activation Lock

Thanks for surfing by.





About Privacy

18 01 2015

If you are an Apple fan and can’t take a joke just skip this post and accept my sincere apology.

2015/01/img_3898.png

In reality you can be sure that Apple takes care of your privacy.

About  Pay …

If you are not familiar with Apple’s payment system, here is what the company publishes on

This is what Apple publishes on its website …

Your wallet.
Without the wallet.
Paying in stores or within apps has never been easier. Gone are the days of searching for your wallet. The wasted moments finding the right card. Now payments happen with a single touch.

Apple Pay will change how you pay with breakthrough contactless payment technology and unique security features built right into the devices you have with you every day. So you can use your iPhone, Apple Watch, or iPad to pay in a simple, secure, and private way.

Related links …

Security Made by Apple

Tim Cook about Privacy

Apple Pay with iPhone 6

Thanks for being sympathetic.





iOS 8 Security

5 01 2015

When government comes knocking …

Here is what The Washington Post published on September 18, 2014, shortly after Apple’s Keynote on September 9, the day Tim Cook introduced the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus and the updated operating system iOS 8 for mobile devices.

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Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user information.

The key is the encryption that Apple mobile devices automatically put in place when a user selects a passcode, making it difficult for anyone who lacks that passcode to access the information within, including photos, e-mails and recordings. Apple once maintained the ability to unlock some content on devices for legally binding police requests but will no longer do so for iOS 8, it said in the new privacy policy.

Please read the full article here …

About iOS 8 Security

Beside 2-Step Verification also available for iCloud in many countries this is a further step to more security for Apple’s customers. It should be mentioned that the so-called fragmentation is kept low for Apple’s devices.

See this concept map which shows the iOS versions in relation to all iPhone models on which they can be installed. The map includes what’s published about iOS 8 on Apple’s website after the WWDC event on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco.

IMG_3425.PNG

Just look at the iOS version and count the number of outgoing arrows.

It starts with compatibility to 2 models. Since iOS 6 the installation on the actual model and 3 predecessors is supported. With iOS 7 and 8 Apple’s mobile OS is ready to install on 5 models.

It needs enormous efforts to bring hardware and software engineers together to look into the future and design hardware components usable also for future versions of an OS.

Competitors show us that the alternative way is to build devices regardless what happens with newer versions of the OS.

According to a scary graphic for Android users published by Business Insider in Aug 2014 there are 18,796 unique devices running the Android OS. That fragmentation is tough on developers. It’s too difficult to make sure that an app runs well on each device. It’s one of the reasons why Android has severe disadvantages for customers using their device over years. The issue gets thornier if you look at the OS versions Android devices are running today. Many of them are still running Gingerbread (2.3), a version launched 4 years ago!
In contrast to Android about 91% of iOS devices are running the latest version (7.x) and it’s most likely that a significant percentage of devices will be updated to iOS 8 on the first day of its launch.

It’s a vicious circle to always buy a new (subsidized) device to get the latest OS version. Fragmentation is what developers and customers don’t like because it hampers a unique user experience and needs additional efforts. This might be one of the reasons why iOS is still the preferred platform for developing powerful apps.

Apple wants a perfect user experience for most of it’s loyal customers and developers are supported by the iOS feature ‘Size Classes’ with which Apple said Goodbye to an increasing complexity of code needed to support sizes like 3.5″ (iPhone 4), 4.0″ (iPhone 5), 4.7″ and 5.5″ (iPhone 6), 7.9″ (iPad Mini), and 9.7″ (iPad). Google with its Android OS is still faced with a lot of different form factors and it seems to be an impossible task for developers to ensure a perfect user interface and user experience on all devices.

Summary …

Security isn’t what Apple is just talking about like many other companies.
Today security is strongly related to updated applications and operating systems.

Apple reported that nearly half of the users installed the latest version of the mobile operating system less than a week after its introduction on Sept 17, 2014. The company said 46 percent are using iOS 8 as of Monday, with slightly more (49 percent) using the previous generation of software.

This is an adoption process happening nearly with the speed of light if you compare it with the competitors.

Related links …

Security made by Apple

2-Step Verification

Android Fragmentation

Interested in creating mind maps and concept maps?
See an app review of the app Inspiration here

Inspiration

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About Encryption

29 12 2014

Would you like to be able to use QR-Codes in order to let people quickly get some sensitive information, but also want to be able to restrict the number of people with access to the data? And what about iWork documents containing personal data? Is there a way to securely manage them?

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If you use an app like Qrafter by Kerem Erkan you may have the idea to use password-protected QR-Codes for sending sensitive data e.g. via mail or a messaging app like iMessage.

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The idea seems to be fascinating but let’s face the facts with an answer of the developer Kerem I got via E-Mail:

The encryption is 48-bit, meaning it is weak for any sensitive information. More secure encryption methods take too much data and QR Codes do not have such capacity. You should not use QR Code encryption for anything sensitive.

For the sake of security, it’s hard to beat the old-school, in-person hand off. It’s not the most sexy of options in the digital age, but surely there’s something titillating about a top-secret document hand off. Bring your briefcase and make it like a spy movie. Or don’t.

Don’t send your sensitive documents over email. It may seem private, but even if you’re using an email account that uploads attachments over a more secure HTTPS connection, like GMail, you have no control over your recipient’s server, and they may download your attachment from an unencrypted HTTP connection. Now say they did that from a public Wi-Fi network. Things just got very un-secure.

Some basics …

If you want your data to be NSA-resistant all files must be encrypted on your device before being transferred to the cloud. Your password should never be stored on your device or, if it’s stored there should never leave it. So no unauthorized user, not even employees of your provider, could ever access your data. Client-side encryption is the keyword.

Since encryption occurs before files leave your device it effectively wraps a protective wall around your data in the cloud. Employees then have very limited access to your data. They can only see how many files you have stored and how much storage space they occupy. The files themselves, as well as all metadata (folder names, file names, comments, preview images, etc.), are encrypted. The following chart illustrates three typical encryption schemes. The scheme in the middle is what is used by most cloud storage providers.

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What matters most when encrypting data is not the particular encryption algorithm (e.g. AES), but how it is used. Basically, there are three encryption schemes:

  • 1 None
    No encryption is used. Your data is sent to the storage in plain view, visible to anyone who has access to your network connection as well as to the storage provider. This is a little bit like sending someone a postcard: everyone involved in handling the postcard can read it.
  • 2 Encrypted connection (e.g. SSL)
    In this scheme, a secure channel is established between your computer and the storage provider before data is uploaded. That way, no one can eavesdrop on the transfer. However, the provider sees all your data. Often storage providers implement additional measures like creating corporate policies that disallow their employees to view your data. Another additional measure is using encrypted disks to store your data, so someone breaking into the data center and stealing the hard drives won’t be able to read it. However, it is still visible to the provider and its employees. This approach has the advantage that the provider can process your data for you, such as for creating a search index. Also, it is technically easy to make the data available in the web browser or through an API. The problem with this approach is that your privacy is limited. The storage provider can, for example, be forced to provide your data to a government agency. What’s more, employees will be able to read your data even if prohibited by company policies. It is also much more likely that bugs or other errors could result in data leaks. This is the most widespread approach implemented by cloud storage providers.
  • 3 Client-side encryption
    This approach is inherently more secure than the others. Apart from Box and Wuala, there are only a few other cloud storage providers following this scheme, mostly backup services. All data is encrypted locally on your device before it is uploaded. No one not explicitly authorized by you can see your data. Since not even the storage provider can see your data, they cannot be forced to hand it over to government agencies. The employees are also not able to read your data. As a side effect, it is impossible to recover your password in case you forget it. You can test your cloud storage provider’s security by checking whether they offer password recovery or password reset. If yes, then it does not employ client-side encryption. With client-side encryption, security is embedded deeply in the design of the storage.

    One of the main challenges with client-side encryption is key management. If you only want to back up, a single master key is enough. However, if you want to be able to share data selectively, your cloud storage must feature a sophisticated key management scheme.

With this in mind here is a more secure method to store sensitive data permanently or to exchange information with others.

Use a secure cloud storage, e.g. WUALA or BOX or an encryption software like BOXCRYPTOR and send the information as an encrypted file, a simple text message, a PDF file, or an iWork document.

Say you and your tech-savvy recipient set up a shared folder. Anything you put in that folder would travel encrypted from your folder to the provider’s servers to your recipient’s folder. That’s it.

Boxcryptor …

You use a cloud storage with standard, that means no, additional sevcurity?
Don’t worry. There is a solution for all well-known clouds including all other clouds which support the WebDAV protocol. It’s an application developed by the German company Secomba GmbH.

This video explains how Boxcryptor works.


(2:36 min)

Boxcryptor creates a virtual drive on your device that allows you to encrypt your files locally before uploading them to your cloud or clouds of choice. It encrypts individual files – and does not create containers.

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Any file dropped into an encrypted folder within the Boxcryptor drive will get automatically encrypted before it is synced to the cloud. To protect your files, Boxcryptor uses the AES-256 and RSA encryption algorithms.

Boxcryptor is free for one device and one cloud provider. You cannot use two iOS devices to manage encrypted files as long as both devices are linked to Boxcryptor. If you want to share encrypted files with others you can do that without a subscription.

A workaround …

You cannot turn off iCloud for individual iWork documents. So, creating a new document with sensitive data is a risk because the content automatically finds its way into iCloud.
Even if you turn off iCloud for documents but still use iCloud for backing up your device, your documents will be stored in iCloud and Apple has the key to decrypt them.

Here is a workaround which lets you manage encrypted iWork documents using Boxcryptor.

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This is definitely not a comfortable way but the only option to keep sensitive information away from unauthorized people. Even if government comes knocking there is no chance to decrypt your data regardless of the provider keeping your files. I would understand if you say “I hear the message well but lack faith’s constant trust.”.

Summary …

Sad to say that effective encryption is still not a standard feature of using cloud storages. Even Apple doesn’t use client-side encryption and so you should be careful when creating documents with sensitive data. Even if you deactivate syncing via iCloud your documents will find their way into the cloud when your iPad or iPhone initiates the next backup to iCloud.

Related links …

About QR-Codes

Mystic signs of progress

About encryption

Notes on encryption

About clouds

The cloudy iCloud

Risky free clouds

iOS cloud clients

Box for iOS

Thanks for flying with iNotes4You.








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