Follow me!

5 05 2013

The Daily Post at WordPress.com wrote

Here at WordPress.com, we love blogs. We love bloggers. And more than anything, we love bloggers who blog. You’re the bee’s knees. The cat’s pajamas. The apples of our virtual eyes.
(Okay, we’ll stop now.)
We’re bloggers too, so we know that signing up for a blog, picking a theme, and getting your site set up just the way you want it is the easy part (no, really!). Figuring out what you want your blog to be, coming up with regular posts, and finding your niche in the ever-expanding blogosphere – that’s the toughie.

You picked out what the Daily Post wrote?

Bloggers are enthusiasts. iNotes4You is completely without any commercial purposes. WordPress may place some ad in non commercial blogs but they do it, I think, only if the blog has thousands of readers every day. iNotes4You is far far away from this tremendous number of readers.

What the author did not mention is:
Bloggers need food and the food are interesting connections all over the world. This is the moving power to continue.

You may ask me:
Why did you fly into the blogosphere?

There are many reasons which make blogging so satisfying for me. But the main point is to get contacts around the world no matter of country, religion, and color of the skin, exchanging information, and opening the mind for different opinions.

My profession is to develop Microsoft Access databases. Even if you are no developer you may know that programming is a very hard job with the focus on a flat screen and text which is far far away from poetry. I do it since more about 35 years starting with Z80-based computers. I think younger readers of my blog don’t know anything about this dinosaurs of heavy electronic machinery.

The Sharp MZ was a series of personal computers sold in Japan and Europe (particularly Germany and Great Britain) by Sharp beginning in 1978.
The MZ 80K was my first machine and it offered a real alphanumeric keyboard (the previous model had a hexadecimal keyboard) and an well-known audio cassette as the ‘mass storage’.

It was one of the popular early consumer-level microcomputers, with an architecture based on the Zilog Z80 8-bit microprocessor with 48KB (in words: forty-eight kilobyte; it’s the number following 47 and preceding 49) with 32KB available for user programs. It could run a variety of high-level languages including BASIC, Pascal and FORTRAN, which had to be loaded via tape into RAM before any programming could be undertaken.

20130504-123226.jpg

So you might understand that blogging today on an iPad and an iPhone is a cushy job.

Al that began when buying my first Apple device, an iPhone 3GS. To discover all the features of this small device is amazing if the old heavy machinery is still in your mind. It’s like a virus but a completely unknown species because it’s inspirational.

I would appreciate if you deliver the medicine to survive the Apple virus.
You can do it by sharing and commenting.

20130303-141919.jpg

Here are my social network contacts where you can share and comment.

https://plus.google.com/116431277733031496736
the fascinating, contentful network

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/thomas-unterstenhoefer/62/66/264
the business network with some lacks

http://pinterest.com/iNotes4You
the image network

http://iNotes4You.tumblr.com
the ‘I don’t know for what’ network

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/iNotes4You
the more passive images-organized-in-folders network

http://about.me/iNotesFourYou
the short-haul-flight network

http://www.facebook.com/thomas.unterstenhoefer
the dating-and-consumer-iformation network with a UI disaster

https://mobile.twitter.com/iNotes4You
the bubble-forwarding network, opaque even in your native language

Why all these engagements?
Well, these networks are supported by WordPress and I know that there are different preferences to share content. So nearly everybody is served.

Thanks for dropping by.





Facts about iMessage

3 03 2013


Apple talks about iMessage …

If you’re a texter, you’ll love Messages on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Now they all come with iMessage, a service that’s an even better kind of texting. Because it’s free for you and anyone texting over Wi-Fi using an iOS device or Mac with iMessage. And it’s unlimited. So say as much as you want.

This is the link to Apple’s website iMessage

iMessage is accessible through the Messages app on an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch running iOS 5 or later or on a Mac running OS X Mountain Lion or later. For users who have an active data connection, Messages will check with Apple if the recipient has iMessage set up. If so, Messages will seamlessly transition from SMS to iMessage.

The recipient must use an Apple device as iMessage is an Apple service and not based on services of your carrier.

iMessage is not tied to a particular device or SIM card – it uses an Apple ID.
Consequently the Apple ID you entered during the device set-up phase will be the one used for iMessage by default. The Apple ID can be changed from within the Settings app, but more importantly you can also set up “proxy” E-Mail addresses through which you can receive iMessages. These proxy addresses act as gateways through which iMessages can be funneled into your Apple ID, which is what actually stores your messages. If you have an iPhone your phone number is also added automatically to this list of “proxies”.

Notes
A PROXY is a computer system or an application that acts as an intermediary for requests. Servers of your provider for example are proxies as they receive information and send them to you.

If you don’t have a SIM card inserted (e.g. in an iPad) iMessages can be sent from your device if you are connected to the internet. But if the recipient cannot receive iMessages you cannot contact him via Apple’s Messages because automatic switching from iMessage to SMS service is only possible with a SIM card.

Activating iMessage …

During activating iMessage there are several messages coming up which I don’t describe here because they are self-explaining.

  • Turn on iMessage.
    A popover with your Apple ID comes up.
  • Enter your password.
    If you activate iMessage Apple will send a confirmation for your phone number to the UK (+44 7786205094) to register this phone number in the global catalog for iMessage capable devices. You have to pay the normal fee for this SMS. In Germany its 0.28€.
  • From then on your phone number and your Apple ID are used for iMessage.
  • If you use further Apple devices all the information is pushed to them. So you just have to turn on iMessage on other devices.
  • The whole procedure is also valid for Facetime activation.

You may add further E-Mail addresses.
Each entry will be verified by Apple through sending an E-Mail to this address. It contains a link ‘Verify E-Mail’ for verifying this particular address.

20130118-151757.jpg

Wit the release of iOS 7 in Sep 2013 Apple adapted just the layout of iMessage and added the new feature ‘Blocked’ with which you can choose a contact from ‘Contacts’ and block any iMessage communication with selected people.

20131001-061845.jpg

The whole setup procedure, the system behavior, and the restrictions remained the same. iMessage is still not available for establishing connections with devices of other vendors. This is quite understandable because it’s an Apple service and requires an Apple ID.

Restrictions …

If the recipient does not use iMessage (because he owns no Apple device, deactivated iMessage or cannot connect to the internet) your message will be sent as a usual SMS unless you turned off the option ‘Send as SMS’ in Setting – Messages.

Features and behavior …

From the users point of view iMessage works like sending an SMS with the following exceptions and additional features:

01 Appearance

  • On your screen iMessages you sent to the recipient appear in a blue, usual SMS in a green bubble.

02 File Attachments

  • With iMessage you can send file attachments like photos, screenshots and videos. When using WiFi videos are compressed to 360 x 480 pixels and cannot exceed 100 MB. If you use the Cellular 3G connection the quality of videos is strongly reduced. A video should not be longer than 90 sec.

03 Group Chat

  • If you select more than one recipient to send your message to iMessage starts a group chat.
    All consecutive messages are sent to all members of the group chat. Within a running chat single members cannot be excluded.

04 SMS

  • If an iMessage cannot be sent double tap the message and select ‘Send as SMS’ from the context menu. You may also let iMessage do this automatically if you go to Settings – Messages and turn on ‘Send as SMS’. Carrier messaging rates may apply.

05 Text length

  • A message with more than 960 characters will be cut into pieces. Each part contains up to 960 characters. The maximum length is 4000 characters.
    You can activate ‘Character Count’ in Settings – Messages to see the length of your message.

06 Encryption

  • Messages sent via iMessage are unlike usual SMSs Point-to-Point encrypted.
    To my state of knowledge Apple did not publish details of the encryption protocol.
  • Corporate security is compromised when users who rely on iMessage are unable to transmit messages via Apple’s platform, as iMessage may revert to sending a regular unencrypted text message (SMS). A single finger swipe allows users to exchange public encryption keys, encrypt text messages, and protect text, audio, video, and picture messages from eavesdroppers by going through a carrier-based network instead of through the cloud.

07 Delivery confirmation

  • A ‘Delivered’ note next to each message indicates a successful delivery and there is also the option of sending ‘Send Read Receipts’ – these simply allow the other persons sending an iMessage to know that you have read their message.

08 Editing and Status informations

  • Tap on the Edit icon of an iMessage to forward a message or delete it.
    During a conversation iMessage displays a bubble with three points when your partner edits his new message.

  • A profile for iOS devices is available for logging all iMessages on the device.
    The installation is on one’s own responsibility.

    iOS Profile for Logging iMessages

09 Transmission time

  • iMessages reach the recipient meanly within 2 sec while an SMS usually needs 5 sec.

10 Notification

  • Go to Settings – Notifications – Messages and use appropriate settings for notifications.
    If you only want to be informed about an incoming iMessage in the Lock Screen turn off ‘Show Preview’.

11 Further devices

  • iMessages are automatically pushed to all your other iOS-Devices where iMessage is activated.

12 Different SIM Cards

  • If you frequently visit foreign countries the use of a local SIM may save costs.
    But what happens with iMessage?
    As iMessage is not carrier-based you must not do anything. Your phone number is admittedly different from that you used when activating iMessage. But your Apple ID remains the same and is alternatively used when your phone number has changed. But keep in mind that in this case iMessage only works with an internet connection because your new local phone number is not registered in Apple’s iMessage address pool.

Thanks for reading this post.
Please comment or use the contact form on the ‘About’ page.
With positive comments you feed the blogger, with negative comments you goose him to improve the quality.





Push and Pull

27 02 2013

We are not talking about pull-down menus or push-up bras.

This blog is about the technology to immediately transfer information to a recipient (Push) or to get information by asking if there are any news available (Pull).

What is Push and Pull?

Push
The Post office is the active part and delivers the mail when there are new letters.
Getting a phone call and the daily newspaper are examples for the Push technology’s well.
In all situations you subscribed to something.

Pull
You are the active part when going to the post office and looking for new letters in your post office box. This generates more ‘traffic’ and so it’s not as efficient as the Push procedure.
I there is nothing new you flogged a dead horse.

Further examples of the Pull technology are browsing the web, where you ask via Google Search Engine and get the answer from a Web server which displays the site you were looking for.
No subscription is required to use the Pull technology. Unlike buying a newspaper at the kiosk your mobile device has to identify itself to get the requested information. This is done by your provider in connection with your SIM card.

20130114-191908.jpg

Some of your iPhone apps are more pushy than others, and often you’d like them to stay that way. These apps take advantage of Apple’s push notification service to send you badges, sounds and alerts. However, too many notices from too many apps can get distracting, even annoying.
Push notifications of apps can be set up individually or collectively using SETTINGS of your device.

What does your device do?

20130114-192804.jpg

Deactivate all push notifications …

Go to Settings – Notifications and turn off ‘Scheduled’.
Set suitable options for ‘Allow Calls From’ and ‘Repeated Calls’
Then go back to Settings and turn on ‘Do not disturb’.

Deactivate all push notifications for an app …

To completely turn off push notifications just turn off everything you just listed for that particular app: badges, banners, sounds, and whether the app appears in the ‘Notification Center’.

Not every app has to keep a connection open to some server, but there is one central connection that is kept alive for all push notifications for all apps.

In other words:
If you turn push off for an app that doesn’t receive any, there will be no change in battery life whatsoever. The easy way to know which push notifications are sucking your battery life, just look at what you’re receiving more often during the day. If you receive a Twitter notification every 5 minutes, all day long, the screen will always have to turn itself on to show it to you. This adds up usage minutes and drains battery power.

E-Mail …

Got to Settings – Mail, Contacts, Calendars – Fetch New Data.
If you turn on ‘Push’ you will get E-Mail immediately after your provider received a message for you. If you turn off ‘Push’ the timeframe below will be valid and uses the PULL technology that means, your device asks your provider whether there is anything new for you.

The battery life …

I found many articles saying that the battery life decreases rapidly when turning on push notifications. I started a test with 5 E-Mail accounts and activated notifications for Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, iMessage, about.me, Quora, StumbleUpon, 4 forums via Tapatalk and the German ifun.de sending messages nearly every 20 minutes.

Measuring the battery capacity on a normal day with Push and on another day without Push my impression was that there is no significant difference. This is admittedly subjective as I am not able to set laboratory conditions. 3-5% more or less battery power is marginal compared to the other 70 to 80% the iPhone consumes while doing other things.

If you want to save energy you must deactivate all settings which make the device to a smartphone and you better move over to a 20$ mobile phone.

You can find many suggestions about using push or pull to keep your battery alive for a longer time. All these discussions are for the trash, because the energy consumption depends on
how many notifications you get on an average and how Push is implemented in the different applications. Setting up Push requires to keep at least one connection alive all the time. Otherwise the pushing party would contact the nirvana. If there are less notifications it’s recommended to use Push technology because keeping a connection alive does not drain your power significant.

Pull technology is recommended for users who want to decide themselves what and what time he wants to really use the information. It’s monkey business to receive all the informations even if you have no time to read them.

So decide for yourself whether using Push or Pull.

My personal recommendation is, pull the information you want at a time you want and on an amount you want and don’t let the aliens give the beat. You only read your E-Mails when you are in a position to and have the time. Doing a manual download takes seconds and information can be read then or at your leisure.

Reducing energy consumption …

Here are some suggestions to reduce energy consumption when using Apple’s new operating system iOS 7.

20131201-173645.jpg

The history …

The Apple Push Notification Service is a service created by Apple Inc. that was launched together with iOS 3.0 on June 17, 2009. It uses push technology through a constantly open IP connection to forward notifications from the servers of third party applications to the Apple devices.
Scott Forstall stated that push notifications were a better means to maintain battery life than background processes (which are used for pull technology) as far as receiving notifications are concerned.

A more technical view …

github
Apple Push Service Protocol

Thanks for dropping by.








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 188 other followers

%d bloggers like this: