Apple SWOT Analysis

31 03 2015

Here is my revamped version of Apple’s SWOT including some groundbreaking decisions and engagements of the company in 2014.

The deal with China Mobile, iOS in the car, engagement in mobile payment systems with  Pay, development of disrupting technology with wearables, and the cooperation with IBM are essential parts of the strategy powered by Tim Cook and his excellent engineers.

After Steve Jobs’ death many publishing media rumored that Apple’s power of innovation would be over. But we must not forget that it was not only Steve Jobs who did the work before 2011. Thousands of highly qualified employees went along with him and still go along with Tim Cook.

Andrew Taylor, Boston Consulting Group, wrote …

Companies that continually create value over the long term a meaning decades or more, learn how to ingrain the ability into their corporate makeup; it becomes part of their culture and DNA. They create value, jobs, and growth because of their ability to institutionalize innovation.

A SWOT analysis is used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats in a business venture. It’s used in any decision-making situation when a desired end-state has been defined.

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SWOTs may look completely different if created from external or involved people.

Annotations …

‘Vendor Lock-In’ is mentioned by some analysts but I have a quite different opinion. Nearly all other tech companies try to link their customers to their ecosystems as well.

And here is an interesting suggestion made by Michael Lapham in the comment section of my post on Google+:

If you are going to add Decreasing market share as a weakness then I suggest you add Customer demographic as a strength. Much of the market share decrease is from the entry level market while Apple continues to dominate where individuals have higher income and more education.

Related links …

About innovation

Tim Cook, the job after Jobs

Review of the app Inspiration

Thanks for visiting iNotes4You.





Tim Cook about privacy

26 03 2015

An open letter from Tim Cook, CEO at Apple Inc. since August 24, 2011, regarding Apple products, services and beliefs …

At Apple, your trust means everything to us. That’s why we respect your privacy and protect it with strong encryption, plus strict policies that govern how all data is handled.

Security and privacy are fundamental to the design of all our hardware, software, and services, including iCloud and new services like Apple Pay.

And we continue to make improvements. Two-step verification, which we encourage all our customers to use, in addition to protecting your Apple ID account information, now also protects all of the data you store and keep up to date with iCloud.
We believe in telling you up front exactly what’s going to happen to your personal information and asking for your permission before you share it with us. And if you change your mind later, we make it easy to stop sharing with us. Every Apple product is designed around those principles. When we do ask to use your data, it’s to provide you with a better user experience.

We’re publishing this website to explain how we handle your personal information, what we do and don’t collect, and why. We’re going to make sure you get updates here about privacy at Apple at least once a year and whenever there are significant changes to our policies.

A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product.

But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy. Our business model is very straightforward: We sell great products.

We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don’t “monetize” the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don’t read your email or your messages to get information to market to you.

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Our software and services are designed to make our devices better. Plain and simple.

One very small part of our business does serve advertisers, and that’s iAd. We built an advertising network because some app developers depend on that business model, and we want to support them as well as a free iTunes Radio service. iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.

Finally, I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will.

Our commitment to protecting your privacy comes from a deep respect for our customers. We know that your trust doesn’t come easy. That’s why we have and always will work as hard as we can to earn and keep it.

Tim
September 2014

Thanks for a remarkable statement.

Summary …

I cannot validate any of Tim’s statements. It needs technicians to look at the details. But what I know is that there is no evidence to not trust in Tim’s announcement.

Related links …

Tim Cook, the job after Jobs

2-Step Verification

Apple and the NSA

Thanks for dropping by.





iOS in the car

20 03 2015

or

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

This can happen if a high-tech car (a brand new Audi A3 with state-of-the-art security features), an iPhone (a generally disturbing factor like any other electronic device in the hands of humans), and an experienced driver (but inattentive for just a second) come together on a German Autobahn (freeway) and cause a rear-end collision with an extremely high deceleration. See the photo, does it look like a heavy impact? No, but it was horrible and fortunately the car got sidetracked because the other party drove a brand new Volkswagen designed to redirect forces.

It was on February 11, 2015 and the car (fortunately a fully insured rental car) was a total loss. The driver, it was me, still suffers from lots of bruises and a breastbone fracture caused by various airbags which opened in a jiffy to prevent the loss of an Apple fan.

You might call me a moron but you shouldn’t forget that humans frequently are as buggy as iOS 8. Shit happens Crashes happen.

Here is the recommendation for all of you based on my experience:

Your iThing is a really useful e-helper but neither an iPhone, nor an iPad, nor a Watch, nor any other iOS based feature (except navigation) should be used in a moving 4-wheel mobile device.

The human brain is a processor with a single CPU (nevertheless in some way much more powerful than any 64-Bit iThing ever can be) and it’s not capable of multitasking. It either focuses on the traffic or communicates with your iThing regardless of talking to SIRI or listening to Apple’s voice assistant intensively.

Whatever Apple will tell you

“Invite more apps along for the ride.”
or
“CarPlay The best iPhone experience on four wheels.”

iOS in the car is only helpful if it’s working quietly in the background, giving you some short audio advices, or just monitors what you are doing. Users are acquainted with all the security advices but often do not act rational. That’s what vendors of infotainment systems know but ignore when advertising their products.

Some headlines showing the facts …

Thats what I found with a quick Google search:

  • Distractions caused by smartphones contribute to about 25% of U.S. automobile accidents
  • Wake-up call: Accidents linked to smartphone use rising in Tokyo
  • Some 40 million Koreans now have smartphones, and an increasing number of them are causing accidents in busy areas
  • Germany’s Autobahnen are getting more and more dangerous because of the usage of smartphones. It’s unjustifiable that e.g. Ford allows the forwarding of an SMS to the navigation display.

… and uncountable more publications.

Definitely not the right way to solve the problem is to separate the normal people from the addicts like the city of Chongqing in China reportedly did when setting up the country’s first sidewalk for ‘mobile phone addicts’, with a lane specifically dedicated to those glued to their screens.

There is just one solution.

First think wether you really need a constant incoming bit radiation.
If it’s relevant, stop before using your mobile device.

Do you know that mobiles can be powered off?

It saves lives, yours, others, and that of your battery.

Steve Jobs take …

“My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules…
That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand.
I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids.”

Just adopt Steve’s belief for yourself.

Note …

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

originally the title of a well-know 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western means in this context

The Audi, me, and the pain.

Related links …

Multitasking

China sets up first ever mobile phone lane

I hope you didn’t read this post in your car while driving.

Thanks for dropping by.





More than dissensions

16 03 2015

If I look back on 2 years of social networking, Androids and others often attacked me without any good reason. This let me quit my job as a moderator in an Apple related community and let me stop replying to any comments made by trolls or others. If they appear in my profile stream or in the comment section of my community posts, I simply delete them and block the guys who definitely show personality traits that fall in the so-called Dark Triad.

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The worrisome result of scientific researches about fanboyism is described in an article of Chris Mooney on SLATE com. You will find the results in my blogpost Fanboyism.

Even though a G+ membership is free, you sometimes have to pay a price for holding an opinion regarding mobile devices, admiring Apple and its leaders, and publishing all this on the internet. And sometimes it’s a heavy price if you are a German and faced with more than 90 year old resentments, even if you are born after the end of the NAZI terror regime.

But …

there are no evil forces standing behind my profile picture.

It’s just me, an open-minded old man, engaged in social networking and sometimes telling others his very personal and subjective opinion.

What’s wrong with that?

With my engagement here on G+ I just want to connect to people all over the world regardless of color, religion, age, sex, and political orientation as long as etiquettes are maintained.

Related links …

More about fanboys and a disease of our times which should receive attention …

Fanboyism

I had a dream

Thanks to all of you for reading, staying cool, being open-minded, and following some principles of respectful interaction between humans.





March 9, 2015

10 03 2015

An Apple event without highlights except the re-engineered MacBook.

My summary of the event regarding the new mobile family member, aka Apple Watch:

Desperate efforts to convince people that they need a smart watch.

My daughter son (I don’t have a daughter) forgot his key, called me on my Apple Watch and I opened the garage door for him via my brand new iThing. That’s what we learned this evening. I hope that my garage door will never be opened by John Doe or Mr. A.N. Onymus. 



Maybe I’m too old to see the benefits of this or other features. The reason can be that I’m not a stressed CEO who isn’t able to personally organize the relevant daily stream of bits.

By the way, the Microsoft Band is a suitable and cheap way to prepare for the next half-marathon in Africa.

More about the watch from an Apple fan who sometimes is Thinking differently.

Note
To understand all this I recommend to have a look into the Apple Live Event Mar 9, 2015.

Thanks for now.





UI and UX

6 03 2015

Not all readers are familiar with all the abbreviations used in the IT world.

So, UI means the User Interface and describes the layout of an app seen by a user. Developers should follow some standards published by Apple in The iOS Human Interface Guidelines (see ‘Related links …’).

UX means the User Experience and describes what users feel when they use an app or a device the first time and extensively later on. The impression must be positive to keep the app on the device for further usage resp. win a loyal customer.

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Both UI and UX are in some way subjective criteria but essential for generating acceptance and loyalty.

Steve Jobs told us on the WWDC in 1997 …

You‘ve got to start with the customer experience and work back toward the technology – not the other way around.

Designers play an essential role in the development of successful products. It’s Sir Jonathan Ive (lead designer of MacBook Pro, iMac, MacBook Air, iPod, iPod Touch, iPhone, iPad, iPad Mini and iOS 7/8) who is responsible for design at Apple, Inc.

Sir Jonathan tells us …

Simplicity is often equated with minimalism. Yet true simplicity is so much more than just the absence of clutter or the removal of decoration. It’s about offering up the right things, in the right place, right when you need them. It’s about bringing order to complexity. And it’s about making something that always seems to “just work.” When you pick something up for the first time and already know how to do the things you want to do, that’s simplicity.

Related links …

Apple’s Human Interface Guidelines

Designed by Apple in California

Two examples for perfectness …

iThoughts (mind mapping tool)

Compass (Apple’s built-in iPhone app)

Thanks for visiting iNotes4You.





Go green

4 03 2015

Tens of thousands of data centers (509,147 according to Emerson Network Power, 2011) that now exist support the overall explosion of digital information. Stupendous amounts of data are set in motion each day with an innocuous click or tap.



On the annual shareholder meeting in 2014 Tim Cook talked about climate change deniers:

If you only want me to make things, make decisions that have a clear ROI, then you should get out of the stock.

To say it with William Shakespeare:

Well roared, Lion.

On February 23, 2015 the company Apple announced a €1.7 billion plan to build and operate two data centres in Europe.

The new facilities, located in County Galway, Ireland, and Denmark’s central Jutland, will power Apple’s online services including the iTunes Store, App Store, iMessage, Maps and Siri for customers across Europe.

They will run entirely on clean, renewable energy sources from day one. Apple will also work with local partners to develop additional renewable energy projects from wind or other sources to provide power in the future. These facilities will have the lowest environmental impact yet for an Apple data center.

More about Apple’s environmental initiatives 

The Hidden Price

Thanks for dropping by.








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